You Should Probably Get You Plane Tickets Soon   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/25/1094706897/you-should-probably-get-your-plane-tickets-soon

The Indicator this week discusses what is happening in the airline industry. After hard hits from COVID-19 they are finally expecting to make profits this year, but there are many factors that could crush those expectations. Limited staffing and picketing from fatigued pilots and higher jet fuel prices due to the limited supply of oil are just some of the major problems facing these airline companies. Ticket prices will go up as consumers bear the brunt of the oil shortage. Airlines are also cutting different flight paths as there is not enough incentive to keep servicing certain routes. The biggest take away is to book your tickets early and be prepared for rising prices.

Original Air Date: April 25, 2022

Length: 10 minutes 17 seconds

How Manatees Got Into Hot Water   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/08/1091736131/how-manatees-got-into-hot-water

Back in the 1970’s, manatees were close to extinction because of ruined habitats and speedboats. Over time power companies started to notice that groups of manatees were congregating around their power plants due to the warm water they produce. This episode of Planet Money discusses the unlikely partnership between environmentalists and power companies to conserve the manatee and how they make that possible. Conservation policies needed to adapt the idea that to save the manatees, the power plants also need to be saved. The warm water keeps the manatees alive but what happens when we move to more renewable energy resources? Pat Rose, a conservationist known as the “manatee man”, joins the show to explain what is going on in the manatee world today and what the future looks like.

Original Air Date: April 8, 2022

Length: 24 minutes 2 seconds

Ellora Derenoncourt discusses how economic prospects declined for the generations of African Americans that followed the Great Migration   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.aeaweb.org/research/ellora-derenoncourt-great-migration

In this AEA Research Highlights podcast, Derenoncourt discusses her findings on how some policies that encourage families to move to opportunity ignore the fundamentals that allow neighborhoods to thrive. In her paper, Derenoncourt uses evidence from the Great Migration to show why earning potential has decreased for African Americans living in those same neighborhoods that once promised a better life.

Original Air Date: March 2, 2022

Length: 19 Minutes 32 Seconds

Paper Citation: Derenoncourt, Ellora. 2022. “Can You Move to Opportunity? Evidence from the Great Migration.” American Economic Review, 112 (2): 369-408.

Posted April 18, 2022 by fiorinio in Inequality, Urban economics

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The raging 2020s with Alec Ross   Leave a comment

Link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/news-not-noise/id1585743634?i=1000550850554

New York Times bestselling author Alec Ross talks about his new book, The Raging 2020s, and explains how that restore the balance of power between the government, businesses, and citizens a new social contract is needed for modern America.

Discussion Prompt: After listening to the podcast, do you agree that America needs a new social contract for the economy to thrive? While answering this question, use your economic thinking and reflect on ideas like wealth inequality, taxes, and unions.  

Original Air Date: February 12, 2022

Length: 32 minutes 28 seconds

Do you teach with podcasts?   Leave a comment

If you use podcasts for teaching economics, you may find a new audioecon.com resource useful. Check out the new ‘Listening to Podcasts for Learning‘ page for tips to share with your students who may be used to listening to podcasts for pleasure, but could use some guidance in listening to learn. We also have a downloadable PowerPoint slide deck available for you to share in your classes or on your learning platform. Thanks to audioecon.com contributors and Emmanuel College students Olivia Fiorini and Eliana Falleur for putting these resources together.

Posted March 18, 2022 by audioecon in Teaching Ideas

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Should Cities Invest in Sports Stadiums?   Leave a comment

Link: https://wordsandnumbers.libsyn.com/episode-264-should-cities-invest-in-sports-stadiums

James Harrigan and Antony Davies, hosts of the Words & Numbers podcast, discuss various topics from US sanctions on Russia. Lauren Heller, Associate Professor of Economics at the Campbell School of Business, then joins them to consider the public funding of sports arenas and the economics behind it. Lauren discusses false profit projections and how the actual payoff for say, the Super Bowl is really only about 10% of those hopeful projected profits. Politicians, fans, and the continued belief in false projections all play a part in the pushing for new stadiums, but in reality they don’t provide the huge economic benefits that cities are promised.

Original Air Date: March 2, 2022

Length: 34 minutes 6 seconds

Of Boats and Boxes   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/11/16/1056299014/of-boats-and-boxes

California Ports were not prepared for the consumer purchasing patterns shift from the pandemic. Instead of vacations, families were buying a new refrigerator or couch. This unpredictable increase in demand combined with the ports’ fragile system caused a supply chain issue that is still affecting America today.

Original Air Date: November 17, 2021

Length: 24 Minutes 55 Seconds

Mexican drug cartels are getting into the avocado and lime business   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/02/19/1081948884/mexican-drug-cartels-are-getting-into-the-avocado-and-lime-business

On this episode of NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, Scott Simon and Emily Green discuss the involvement and control that cartels have in the avocado and lime business in Mexico. Mexico exports about 80% of the US avocado supply and generates around $2.8 billion a year, giving cartels the incentive to get involved. They have been controlling farmers and sending threats to inspectors which caused the US to enforce a short-term ban of avocados from Mexico. With the entanglement of the cartels, you might have to start looking for a different alternative to put on your toast in the morning.

Original Air Date: February 19, 2022

Length: 5 minutes 4 seconds

A locked door, a secret meeting and the birth of the Fed (Classic)   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/12/01/1060610393/a-locked-door-a-secret-meeting-and-the-birth-of-the-fed-classic

On this episode from Planet Money, they discuss the events and people that led the creation of the Fed, relevant in 2022 in light of the pressure the Fed is facing in as inflation continues to rise. A quick guide to J.P. Morgan’ s influence and help with founding the Fed so big bailouts no longer had to fall on his pockets.

Original Air Date: December 20, 2013

Length: 17 minutes 10 seconds

Price Controls, Black Markets, And Skimpflation: The WWII Battle Against Inflation   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2022/02/08/1078035048/price-controls-black-markets-and-skimpflation-the-wwii-battle-against-inflation

During World War II, when inflation was very high, the United States government took many different actions to fight it including implementing an income tax, rationing, and price ceilings. Today we have the Federal Reserve which means we will hopefully not have to resort to these drastic measures to fix inflation ever again.

Original Air Date: February 8, 2022

Length: 23 Minutes 24 Seconds