Do you teach with podcasts?   Leave a comment

If you use podcasts for teaching economics, you may find a new audioecon.com resource useful. Check out the new ‘Listening to Podcasts for Learning‘ page for tips to share with your students who may be used to listening to podcasts for pleasure, but could use some guidance in listening to learn. We also have a downloadable PowerPoint slide deck available for you to share in your classes or on your learning platform. Thanks to audioecon.com contributors and Emmanuel College students Olivia Fiorini and Eliana Falleur for putting these resources together.

Posted March 18, 2022 by audioecon in Teaching Ideas

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Welcome to audioecon!   1 comment

This site is a curated library of economics-themed podcasts, primarily from Planet Money, but also from Freakonomics, EconTalk, This American Life and others. The site is designed for economics instructors with searchable categories created with the instructor in mind, as well as  suggestions for podcast-related assignments they might incorporate into course instruction.  Audioecon will also be of interest to anyone who enjoys  learning more about economics. Audioecon and related assignments is featured in the Journal of Economics Education article Podcasts as a Tool for Teaching Economics  Vol.45, Iss.3, 2014.

I hope you find this site useful and interesting, and welcome your feedback!

I wish you smart listening!

Posted June 27, 2012 by audioecon in Utility

The great reset?   Leave a comment

Link: https://aearesearchhighlights.libsyn.com/ep-49-the-great-reset

The Covid-19 pandemic has significantly impacted wealth and income disparity. In his paper, Guido Alfani looks back at previous pandemics to see how different factors affected the gap between the rich and poor. Guido explores how we can learn from previous pandemic policies so new policy decisions can have a meaningful impact on decreasing inequality in the long run.

Original Air Date: April 4, 2022

Length: 19 Minutes

Citation: Alfani, Guido. 2022. “Epidemics, Inequality, and Poverty in Preindustrial and Early Industrial Times.” Journal of Economic Literature, 60 (1): 3-40.

Posted June 30, 2022 by fiorinio in Coronavirus Economic Crisis, Inequality

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The student loan paaaaauuuuuse   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/15/1093113723/the-student-loan-paaaaauuuuuse

For some, the student loan repayment pause that started in 2020 has allowed people to purchase houses, cars, and have babies. Most student loan borrowers have not made any payment towards their loans because there is no incentive to; especially with the Biden Administration promising $10,000 of loan forgiveness. If loan repayments were to resume it could be detrimental to those that are not prepared to start making those payments again.

Original Air Date: April 15, 2022

Length: 22 Minutes 44 Seconds

Discussion Prompt: What do you think the macroeconomic consequences would be if the government resumed loan payments?

Tech Giants and Tiny Dogs   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/17/1087425495/tech-giants-and-tiny-dogs

Ramon van Meer’s niche business – making ramps for weiner dogs – boomed as he utilized tools from tech giants to help him grow his businesses. The Planet Money team discusses how these tech giants can help small businesses find their target audiences with marketing tools like Facebook ads. On the other hand they can also severely damage a business model by changing up an simple algorithm or rearranging their data. The volatility of these big tech firm decisions are cause for both growth and decline of such small businesses.

Original Air Date: March 18, 2022

Length: 21 minutes 43 seconds

Benevolence Backfires: The Cobra Effect   Leave a comment

Link: https://wordsandnumbers.libsyn.com/benevolence-backfires-the-cobra-effect

Sometimes laws with good intentions have unforeseen results that end up hurting the people they were meant to protect. James Harrigan and Antony Davies discuss the cobra effect and how government policy decisions bring about unintended consequences.

Original Air Date: September 4, 2019

Length: 33 Minutes 15 Seconds

Money well spent   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.aeaweb.org/research/school-spending-student-outcomes-wisconsin

In this AEA Research Highlights podcast Author Jason Baron discusses the effects of different types of school spending on student outcomes and how school budgets should continue to evolve. Baron’s finds that increased spending on teacher salaries and supportive services positively affected test scores, dropout rates, and postsecondary enrollment, while spending on new buildings and renovations had less of an impact.

Original Air Date: February 18, 2022

Length: 22 Minutes 14 Seconds

Article Citation: Baron, E Jason. 2022. “School Spending and Student Outcomes: Evidence from Revenue Limit Elections in Wisconsin.” American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 14 (1): 1-39.

Why Is Everyone Moving to Dallas?   Leave a comment

Link: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/why-is-everyone-moving-to-dallas/

More Americans have moved to the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area over the past decade than anywhere else in the United States. Freakonomics podcast host Stephen Dubner explores the reasons why Dallas is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas which go deeper than just the decreased cost of living and absence of income taxes.

Original Air Date: January 19, 2022

Length: 49 Minutes 26 Seconds

Whistleblower Protection Program   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/29/1089572956/whistleblower-protection-program

This episode of the Indicator discusses the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the ways in which it regulates businesses. Whistleblowers, the ones who are brave enough to stand up against malpractice in the company, are valuable to the SEC but are often too scared to come forward. Jordan Thomas, a former SEC employee, decided he would make a firm that protected these whistleblowers and made sure they are compensated for the risks they are taking.

Original Air Date: March 29, 2022

Length: 10 minutes 5 seconds

In the 1890s, the Best-Selling Car Was … Electric   Leave a comment

Link: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/in-the-1890s-the-best-selling-car-was-electric/

Today, fewer than 1% of cars in the United States are electric. According to technology historian Tom Standage, the spike in gas prices may push the transition faster than people think. When switching from gas to electric cars, there is more to consider than just the labor market and the demand for gasoline. Standage believes everything will change.

Original Air Date: March 30, 2022

Length: 46 Minutes 20 Seconds

Insuring music venues during a pandemic   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/07/1091489931/insuring-music-venues-during-a-pandemic

You own a business and a pandemic hits so you are forced to shut down, but what do you do when your source of income is terminated? This episode of the Indicator discusses the policies and arguments insurance companies make when it comes to settling in circumstances like the pandemic. They also talk with Summer Gerbing, a small music business owner, who touches upon the steps and actions business owners can take in order to be able to survive when it comes to unforeseen situations, such as a pandemic.

Original Air Date: April 7, 2022

Length: 9 minutes 37 seconds

Two inflation Indicators: Corporate greed and mortgage rates   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/23/1088346603/two-inflation-indicators-corporate-greed-and-mortgage-rates

Prices are still rising even though corporate profits are at a 40-year high. However, the rising inflation is not thought to be due to corporate greed but likely to other causes such as lingering pandemic issues and decreased competition in the markets. The Federal Reserve Bank has tried to fight this inflation by raising interest rates which will hopefully lead to less pressure on businesses to raise their prices.

Original Air Date: March 23, 2022

Length: 18 Minutes 27 Seconds

Posted May 5, 2022 by fiorinio in Federal Reserve Bank, macroeconomics

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