Do you teach with podcasts?   Leave a comment

If you use podcasts for teaching economics, you may find a new audioecon.com resource useful. Check out the new ‘Listening to Podcasts for Learning‘ page for tips to share with your students who may be used to listening to podcasts for pleasure, but could use some guidance in listening to learn. We also have a downloadable PowerPoint slide deck available for you to share in your classes or on your learning platform. Thanks to audioecon.com contributors and Emmanuel College students Olivia Fiorini and Eliana Falleur for putting these resources together.

Posted March 18, 2022 by audioecon in Teaching Ideas

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Welcome to audioecon!   1 comment

This site is a curated library of economics-themed podcasts, primarily from Planet Money, but also from Freakonomics, EconTalk, This American Life and others. The site is designed for economics instructors with searchable categories created with the instructor in mind, as well as  suggestions for podcast-related assignments they might incorporate into course instruction.  Audioecon will also be of interest to anyone who enjoys  learning more about economics. Audioecon and related assignments is featured in the Journal of Economics Education article Podcasts as a Tool for Teaching Economics  Vol.45, Iss.3, 2014.

I hope you find this site useful and interesting, and welcome your feedback!

I wish you smart listening!

Posted June 27, 2012 by audioecon in Utility

Whistleblower Protection Program   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/29/1089572956/whistleblower-protection-program

This episode of the Indicator discusses the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the ways in which it regulates businesses. Whistleblowers, the ones who are brave enough to stand up against malpractice in the company, are valuable to the SEC but are often too scared to come forward. Jordan Thomas, a former SEC employee, decided he would make a firm that protected these whistleblowers and made sure they are compensated for the risks they are taking.

Original Air Date: March 29, 2022

Length: 10 minutes 5 seconds

In the 1890s, the Best-Selling Car Was … Electric   Leave a comment

Link: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/in-the-1890s-the-best-selling-car-was-electric/

Today, fewer than 1% of cars in the United States are electric. According to technology historian Tom Standage, the spike in gas prices may push the transition faster than people think. When switching from gas to electric cars, there is more to consider than just the labor market and the demand for gasoline. Standage believes everything will change.

Original Air Date: March 30, 2022

Length: 46 Minutes 20 Seconds

Insuring music venues during a pandemic   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/07/1091489931/insuring-music-venues-during-a-pandemic

You own a business and a pandemic hits so you are forced to shut down, but what do you do when your source of income is terminated? This episode of the Indicator discusses the policies and arguments insurance companies make when it comes to settling in circumstances like the pandemic. They also talk with Summer Gerbing, a small music business owner, who touches upon the steps and actions business owners can take in order to be able to survive when it comes to unforeseen situations, such as a pandemic.

Original Air Date: April 7, 2022

Length: 9 minutes 37 seconds

Two inflation Indicators: Corporate greed and mortgage rates   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/23/1088346603/two-inflation-indicators-corporate-greed-and-mortgage-rates

Prices are still rising even though corporate profits are at a 40-year high. However, the rising inflation is not thought to be due to corporate greed but likely to other causes such as lingering pandemic issues and decreased competition in the markets. The Federal Reserve Bank has tried to fight this inflation by raising interest rates which will hopefully lead to less pressure on businesses to raise their prices.

Original Air Date: March 23, 2022

Length: 18 Minutes 27 Seconds

Posted May 5, 2022 by fiorinio in Federal Reserve Bank, macroeconomics

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You Should Probably Get You Plane Tickets Soon   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/25/1094706897/you-should-probably-get-your-plane-tickets-soon

The Indicator this week discusses what is happening in the airline industry. After hard hits from COVID-19 they are finally expecting to make profits this year, but there are many factors that could crush those expectations. Limited staffing and picketing from fatigued pilots and higher jet fuel prices due to the limited supply of oil are just some of the major problems facing these airline companies. Ticket prices will go up as consumers bear the brunt of the oil shortage. Airlines are also cutting different flight paths as there is not enough incentive to keep servicing certain routes. The biggest take away is to book your tickets early and be prepared for rising prices.

Original Air Date: April 25, 2022

Length: 10 minutes 17 seconds

How Manatees Got Into Hot Water   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/08/1091736131/how-manatees-got-into-hot-water

Back in the 1970’s, manatees were close to extinction because of ruined habitats and speedboats. Over time power companies started to notice that groups of manatees were congregating around their power plants due to the warm water they produce. This episode of Planet Money discusses the unlikely partnership between environmentalists and power companies to conserve the manatee and how they make that possible. Conservation policies needed to adapt the idea that to save the manatees, the power plants also need to be saved. The warm water keeps the manatees alive but what happens when we move to more renewable energy resources? Pat Rose, a conservationist known as the “manatee man”, joins the show to explain what is going on in the manatee world today and what the future looks like.

Original Air Date: April 8, 2022

Length: 24 minutes 2 seconds

Ellora Derenoncourt discusses how economic prospects declined for the generations of African Americans that followed the Great Migration   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.aeaweb.org/research/ellora-derenoncourt-great-migration

In this AEA Research Highlights podcast, Derenoncourt discusses her findings on how some policies that encourage families to move to opportunity ignore the fundamentals that allow neighborhoods to thrive. In her paper, Derenoncourt uses evidence from the Great Migration to show why earning potential has decreased for African Americans living in those same neighborhoods that once promised a better life.

Original Air Date: March 2, 2022

Length: 19 Minutes 32 Seconds

Paper Citation: Derenoncourt, Ellora. 2022. “Can You Move to Opportunity? Evidence from the Great Migration.” American Economic Review, 112 (2): 369-408.

Posted April 18, 2022 by fiorinio in Inequality, Urban economics

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The raging 2020s with Alec Ross   Leave a comment

Link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/news-not-noise/id1585743634?i=1000550850554

New York Times bestselling author Alec Ross talks about his new book, The Raging 2020s, and explains how that restore the balance of power between the government, businesses, and citizens a new social contract is needed for modern America.

Discussion Prompt: After listening to the podcast, do you agree that America needs a new social contract for the economy to thrive? While answering this question, use your economic thinking and reflect on ideas like wealth inequality, taxes, and unions.  

Original Air Date: February 12, 2022

Length: 32 minutes 28 seconds

Should Cities Invest in Sports Stadiums?   Leave a comment

Link: https://wordsandnumbers.libsyn.com/episode-264-should-cities-invest-in-sports-stadiums

James Harrigan and Antony Davies, hosts of the Words & Numbers podcast, discuss various topics from US sanctions on Russia. Lauren Heller, Associate Professor of Economics at the Campbell School of Business, then joins them to consider the public funding of sports arenas and the economics behind it. Lauren discusses false profit projections and how the actual payoff for say, the Super Bowl is really only about 10% of those hopeful projected profits. Politicians, fans, and the continued belief in false projections all play a part in the pushing for new stadiums, but in reality they don’t provide the huge economic benefits that cities are promised.

Original Air Date: March 2, 2022

Length: 34 minutes 6 seconds