Archive for the ‘Labor market economics’ Category

A Conversation About Child Care In Crisis   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.bostonfed.org/publications/six-hundred-atlantic/season/two/bonus-episode-a-conversation-about-child-care-in-crisis.aspx

Even before the pandemic, childcare has been inaccessible and too expensive for families. Experts Beth Mattingly and Tom Weber discuss the childcare crisis and the impact it has on parents, the labor force, and the economy.

Original Air Date: October 29, 2021

Length: 26 Minutes 19 Seconds

Nobel Prize Economist David Card on testing Econ 101 theories in the real world   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.marketplace.org/2021/10/12/nobel-prize-economist-david-card-on-testing-econ-101-theories-in-the-real-world/

2021 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences recipient David Card used a natural experiment to challenge the Econ 101 concept that a higher minimum wage drives unemployment. Through his research, Card also discovered a way to possibly address issues like the gender wage gap and the wage gap between nonwhite and white workers.

Later in the segment, Card discusses his recognized research on how immigration does not reduce wages according to the Modern Growth Theory.

Original Air Date: October 12, 2021

Length: 10 minutes 48 seconds

The Even More Minimum Wage   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/03/12/976465414/the-even-more-minimum-wage

This podcast discusses the history and the impact of low wages received by restaurant workers. The federal “tipped” minimum wage has remained stagnant for almost 30 years, while the standard minimum wage has been increased 5 times throughout that time. Policy makers in Washington DC are now proposing the Raise the Wage Act, which, if enacted, would raise the federal minimum wage incrementally to $15 an hour for all workers in all industries, including tipped workers.

Original Air Date: March 17, 2021

Length: 21 minutes and 22 seconds

Economics, Sexism, Data   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2019/05/03/720139562/episode-910-economics-sexism-data

As International Women’s Month begins, this podcast by Planet Money helps highlight some of the issues involving sexism and economics. At the time Alice Wu was an economics undergraduate at UC Berkeley and had found an online job forum but was shocked to see the attitude and banter relating to women in the field of economics. She then used her econ skills to analyze the inherent bias found on the site and put out a report on her findings, leading to many woman in the economic field sharing their stories and exposing some of the sexism they have had to face.

Discussion Prompt: What are some ways that social issues, such as sexism can be address throughout a whole field like economics?

Original Air Date: May 3, 2019

Length: 24 minutes 20 seconds

Educated Workers and America’s Competitiveness   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.stlouisfed.org/timely-topics/educated-workers-and-americas-competitiveness

The United States used to lead the world in their percentage of college graduates. Today, the U.S is lagging behind countries like Japan and South Korea. Dr. Monge-Naranjo from the Federal Reserve Bank discusses how this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and how the United States can benefit from the ideas and technologies being produced elsewhere.

Original Air Date: August 31 2020

Length: 3 minutes 13 seconds

Discussion Prompt: What other ways can this idea benefit the United States? What ways could this be harmful to the United States? Is there any significance or advantage to being “number 1” in terms of college educated workers?

Financing a Sustainable Recovery   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/09/great-reset-podcast-financing-sustainable-recovery-imf/

IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva discusses the need for sustained financial support from governments across the globe. Georgieva emphasizes that policymakers must keep in mind the future of their economies, and promote job creation in sectors which are developing, such as the green energy sector. Additionally, Georgieva discusses the need for investment everywhere in order to inhibit worsening global inequalities.

Original Air Date: September 11, 2020

Length: 16 minutes 11 seconds

America Unemployed   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2020/03/27/822944544/episode-986-america-unemployed

Within the past week, over 3 million people have filed for unemployment, a record number in the United States. Unemployment insurance was intended to help people, while also providing motivation to seek work. Seeking work, however, is close to impossible when you cannot leave your home.

Original Air Date: March 28, 2020

Length: 22 minutes 58 seconds

Discussion Prompt: What are the incentives inherent in the unemployment insurance policy? Do you believe the pandemic will change who qualifies for unemployment/how accessible unemployment benefits in either the short- or the long-run? 

How Are They Doing Now?   Leave a comment

How Are They Doing NowLink: https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2018/02/02/582843102/how-are-they-doing-now

Summary: When the recession hit, many workers within the United States not only lost their jobs, but they also had to cut back a significant amount of their hours. In this podcast, THE INDICATOR checks on three groups to see how they are doing now, part-time workers who want to be full-time, African-American unemployment, and people without college degrees.

Original Air Date: February 2, 2018

Length: 5 minutes 34 seconds

 

Janet Yellen’s Mystery Story   Leave a comment

Janet YellenLink: https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2018/01/31/582224091/janet-yellen-s-mystery-story

Summary: Former head of the Federal Reserve of America, Janet Yellen, communicated about inflation, uncertainty, and monetary policy in one of her speeches last fall. With the current low inflation, the Fed hopes more consumers go out and purchase more goods to help reach the ideal inflation in the country. But as inflation remains low,  the Fed is left puzzling over this mystery.

Original Air Date: January 31, 2018

Length: 6 minutes 48 seconds

Stimulus Response   Leave a comment

Stimulus ResponseLink: https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2018/02/14/585844313/stimulus-response

Summary: What would a liberal economist say about the state of America’s economy today? THE INDICATOR discusses how the country’s economy may need some form of stimulus to boost further economic growth.  However, would the benefits of the short run stimulus for the economy that we say we need, outweigh the cost of the long-term tax cuts?

Original Air Date: February 14, 2018

Length: 6 minutes 30 seconds