Author Archive

In the 1890s, the Best-Selling Car Was … Electric   Leave a comment

Link: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/in-the-1890s-the-best-selling-car-was-electric/

Today, fewer than 1% of cars in the United States are electric. According to technology historian Tom Standage, the spike in gas prices may push the transition faster than people think. When switching from gas to electric cars, there is more to consider than just the labor market and the demand for gasoline. Standage believes everything will change.

Original Air Date: March 30, 2022

Length: 46 Minutes 20 Seconds

Two inflation Indicators: Corporate greed and mortgage rates   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/03/23/1088346603/two-inflation-indicators-corporate-greed-and-mortgage-rates

Prices are still rising even though corporate profits are at a 40-year high. However, the rising inflation is not thought to be due to corporate greed but likely to other causes such as lingering pandemic issues and decreased competition in the markets. The Federal Reserve Bank has tried to fight this inflation by raising interest rates which will hopefully lead to less pressure on businesses to raise their prices.

Original Air Date: March 23, 2022

Length: 18 Minutes 27 Seconds

Posted May 5, 2022 by fiorinio in Federal Reserve Bank, macroeconomics

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Ellora Derenoncourt discusses how economic prospects declined for the generations of African Americans that followed the Great Migration   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.aeaweb.org/research/ellora-derenoncourt-great-migration

In this AEA Research Highlights podcast, Derenoncourt discusses her findings on how some policies that encourage families to move to opportunity ignore the fundamentals that allow neighborhoods to thrive. In her paper, Derenoncourt uses evidence from the Great Migration to show why earning potential has decreased for African Americans living in those same neighborhoods that once promised a better life.

Original Air Date: March 2, 2022

Length: 19 Minutes 32 Seconds

Paper Citation: Derenoncourt, Ellora. 2022. “Can You Move to Opportunity? Evidence from the Great Migration.” American Economic Review, 112 (2): 369-408.

Posted April 18, 2022 by fiorinio in Inequality, Urban economics

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The raging 2020s with Alec Ross   Leave a comment

Link: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/news-not-noise/id1585743634?i=1000550850554

New York Times bestselling author Alec Ross talks about his new book, The Raging 2020s, and explains how that restore the balance of power between the government, businesses, and citizens a new social contract is needed for modern America.

Discussion Prompt: After listening to the podcast, do you agree that America needs a new social contract for the economy to thrive? While answering this question, use your economic thinking and reflect on ideas like wealth inequality, taxes, and unions.  

Original Air Date: February 12, 2022

Length: 32 minutes 28 seconds

Of Boats and Boxes   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/11/16/1056299014/of-boats-and-boxes

California Ports were not prepared for the consumer purchasing patterns shift from the pandemic. Instead of vacations, families were buying a new refrigerator or couch. This unpredictable increase in demand combined with the ports’ fragile system caused a supply chain issue that is still affecting America today.

Original Air Date: November 17, 2021

Length: 24 Minutes 55 Seconds

Price Controls, Black Markets, And Skimpflation: The WWII Battle Against Inflation   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2022/02/08/1078035048/price-controls-black-markets-and-skimpflation-the-wwii-battle-against-inflation

During World War II, when inflation was very high, the United States government took many different actions to fight it including implementing an income tax, rationing, and price ceilings. Today we have the Federal Reserve which means we will hopefully not have to resort to these drastic measures to fix inflation ever again.

Original Air Date: February 8, 2022

Length: 23 Minutes 24 Seconds

How Do You Cure a Compassion Crisis?   Leave a comment

Link: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/compassion-rebroadcast/

Doctors Trzeciak and Mazzarelli talk about the compassion crisis in our healthcare system. In their book titled Compassionomics: The Revolutionary Scientific Evidence that Caring Makes A Difference, the doctors explain when healthcare workers show a little compassion it can decrease costs, improve medical outcomes, and even help with physician burnout.

Original Air Date: November 24, 2021

Length: 54 Minutes 28 Seconds

Risk & Disaster   Leave a comment

Economists Justin Wolfers and Betsey Stevenson discuss insurance and risk and how it is related to economics.

Original Air Date: August 26, 2020

Length: 27 Minutes 27 Seconds

Posted January 11, 2022 by fiorinio in macroeconomics, Planet Money

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Bitcoin Losers (Classic)   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2020/12/30/951460511/bitcoin-losers-classic

The people who lose their passkey to bitcoin have no way of accessing their possible fortune. Find out what this means for all the lost or untouched bitcoin.

Original Air Date: January 1, 2021

Length: 23 Minutes 29 Seconds

Posted January 4, 2022 by fiorinio in Currency, Finance, Planet Money

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Bonds & Becky With The Good Yield   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/08/12/1027086991/planet-money-summer-school-4-bonds-becky-with-the-good-yield

Cornell Professor Vicki Bogan describes what a bond is, how it is different from a stock, and how they help companies grow. Also, learn what happens when you purchase a junk bond.

Discussion Prompt: From your listening (and additional research if you wish), briefly explain the difference between stocks and bonds. What do you think are the pros and cons of investing more in stocks or more in bonds, or a portfolio of both?

Original Air Date: August 18, 2021

Length: 33 Minutes 34 Seconds

Posted December 28, 2021 by fiorinio in Finance, Planet Money

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