Archive for the ‘Teaching Ideas’ Category

The student loan paaaaauuuuuse   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/04/15/1093113723/the-student-loan-paaaaauuuuuse

For some, the student loan repayment pause that started in 2020 has allowed people to purchase houses, cars, and have babies. Most student loan borrowers have not made any payment towards their loans because there is no incentive to; especially with the Biden Administration promising $10,000 of loan forgiveness. If loan repayments were to resume it could be detrimental to those that are not prepared to start making those payments again.

Original Air Date: April 15, 2022

Length: 22 Minutes 44 Seconds

Discussion Prompt: What do you think the macroeconomic consequences would be if the government resumed loan payments?

Do you teach with podcasts?   Leave a comment

If you use podcasts for teaching economics, you may find a new audioecon.com resource useful. Check out the new ‘Listening to Podcasts for Learning‘ page for tips to share with your students who may be used to listening to podcasts for pleasure, but could use some guidance in listening to learn. We also have a downloadable PowerPoint slide deck available for you to share in your classes or on your learning platform. Thanks to audioecon.com contributors and Emmanuel College students Olivia Fiorini and Eliana Falleur for putting these resources together.

Posted March 18, 2022 by audioecon in Teaching Ideas

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Mexican drug cartels are getting into the avocado and lime business   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2022/02/19/1081948884/mexican-drug-cartels-are-getting-into-the-avocado-and-lime-business

On this episode of NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, Scott Simon and Emily Green discuss the involvement and control that cartels have in the avocado and lime business in Mexico. Mexico exports about 80% of the US avocado supply and generates around $2.8 billion a year, giving cartels the incentive to get involved. They have been controlling farmers and sending threats to inspectors which caused the US to enforce a short-term ban of avocados from Mexico. With the entanglement of the cartels, you might have to start looking for a different alternative to put on your toast in the morning.

Original Air Date: February 19, 2022

Length: 5 minutes 4 seconds

Best of ‘EC on Econ’ podcasts FA21   Leave a comment

At the end of each semester students in Econ 1101 Principles of Microeconomics at Emmanuel College create their own podcast to demonstrate their ability to apply microeconomic concepts to their world and to use those terms, theories and tenets of micro to understand and evaluate the world around them. Each semester I pick a few of my favorites to post here on AudioEcon. Check out the ‘Podlearning: Student podcast‘ page to listen and learn for yourself. This semester’s star topics include vaccine externalities, the economics of food banks and food insecurity, and a bartender’s eye view of the elasticity of alcohol.

Econ educators, check out the Podlearning page for assignment descriptions and tips to implement student-created podcasts in your classes!

Posted December 8, 2021 by audioecon in Teaching Ideas, Utility

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Myths And Realities Of America’s Rural Economy   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2021/03/22/980064728/myths-and-realities-of-americas-rural-economy

This week the Indicator talks with Economist Gbenga Ajilore, a senior advisor at the Department of Agriculture about the incorrect assumptions associated with life in rural America. He has studied these rural demographics and now advises policymakers away from these misguided ideas. They discuss the common misconceptions about these rural areas of the US relating to population, jobs, and migration. Some highlights Ajilore shares include: farming is not the only way of life, white people are not the only ones that live in rural areas, and that rural areas are not actually dying out.

Discussion Prompt: What are some other myths about rural areas that have an economic influence?

Original Date: March 22, 2021

Length: 9 minutes 39 seconds

Where Does the Money for Stimulus Checks Come From?   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.marketplace.org/shows/make-me-smart-with-kai-and-molly/where-does-the-money-for-stimulus-checks-come-from/

$1.86 trillion in relief spending has been authorized by congress, which will be financed by the sale of government bonds and other debt instruments. The Federal Reserve Bank will purchase many of these bonds which will cause an inflow of money into the economy. This podcast also elaborates on the inflationary implications of the stimulus checks entering the economy.

There is also discussion of Google’s market power and vaccination progress.

Discussion Prompt: What is the intended goal of the stimulus checks and what unintended consequences can arise as a result?

Original Air Date: March 17, 2021

Length: 19 minutes and 34 seconds

Economics, Sexism, Data   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2019/05/03/720139562/episode-910-economics-sexism-data

As International Women’s Month begins, this podcast by Planet Money helps highlight some of the issues involving sexism and economics. At the time Alice Wu was an economics undergraduate at UC Berkeley and had found an online job forum but was shocked to see the attitude and banter relating to women in the field of economics. She then used her econ skills to analyze the inherent bias found on the site and put out a report on her findings, leading to many woman in the economic field sharing their stories and exposing some of the sexism they have had to face.

Discussion Prompt: What are some ways that social issues, such as sexism can be address throughout a whole field like economics?

Original Air Date: May 3, 2019

Length: 24 minutes 20 seconds

Educated Workers and America’s Competitiveness   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.stlouisfed.org/timely-topics/educated-workers-and-americas-competitiveness

The United States used to lead the world in their percentage of college graduates. Today, the U.S is lagging behind countries like Japan and South Korea. Dr. Monge-Naranjo from the Federal Reserve Bank discusses how this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and how the United States can benefit from the ideas and technologies being produced elsewhere.

Original Air Date: August 31 2020

Length: 3 minutes 13 seconds

Discussion Prompt: What other ways can this idea benefit the United States? What ways could this be harmful to the United States? Is there any significance or advantage to being “number 1” in terms of college educated workers?

Winter is coming for the restaurant industry   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2020/11/18/936321423/winter-is-coming-for-the-restaurant-industry

Bar Gernika in Boise, Idaho

The Planet Money Indicator team explores the choices facing restaurants around the U.S. as the pandemic winter approaches. Includes an interview with a restaurant in Idaho that has implemented new strategies in the 2020 economic reality.

Assignment prompt: How does this podcast illustrate the short-run shutdown decision for firms? Use specific economic concepts from your reading and this podcast to explain the decision making process in general and specifically for firms in a crisis, such as the Covid-19 pandemic.

Original Air Date: November 18, 2020

Length: 9 minutes

Mask Communication   Leave a comment

Link: https://www.npr.org/2020/08/07/900273012/mask-communication

This podcast uses behavioral economics to analyze the reasons why people may refuse to wear masks. Economists believe when these individuals feel external constraints on their freedoms, they feel even less inclined to wear a mask. Behavioral economists discuss nudges/incentives that could be effective in this situation.

Original Air Date: August 7, 2020

Length: 26 minutes 26 seconds

Discussion Prompt: What are some other incentives you can think of that would influence more widespread mask wearing?